CASA club hosts second annual wacky-tacky 5k run and walk

Leighton+Eber+%28%2719%29%2C+meredith+Joyce+%28%2716%29%2C+and+Grace+Pfarr+%28%2716%29+have+a+hoot+while+jogging+at+last+year%27s+CASA+run.

Photo provided by Grace Pfarr

Leighton Eber ('19), meredith Joyce ('16), and Grace Pfarr ('16) have a hoot while jogging at last year's CASA run.

Mark Suchy

The CASA club 5k is not a traditional race; this year the race has a wacky tacky theme. Runners are invited to “be a fool for CASA” and wear their wackiest outfits.

“I think the perfect wacky outfit is one with bright colors and lots of stripes,” club president Jake Turner (’19) said.

People are expected to not only wear bright colors and stripes, but tutus, odd hats, and sparkling objects/clothing.

“I think this year could be even better than last” Libby May (’19) said, “I really like the wacky tacky theme.”

The Court Appointed Special Advocates of Baltimore County (CASA) club will host the second annual 5k run/walk, Sunday April 23. Opening ceremonies will be held at 8:30 a.m. and the run will begin at 9:00 a.m.

“The main goal of CASA club is to raise money and awareness for the foster youth of Baltimore County,” Turner said.

Last year the club hosted the event and it was a huge success; raising more than 5,000 dollars in proceeds for the Foster Youth of Baltimore County. The money go towards the well-being of Baltimore County’s abused and neglected children.

May was a runner in the 5k last year, “I had a great time. I really liked all the stands they had setup for runners after the race,” May said.

This year there will be food provided by Kooper’s Tavern, a DJ, a face painting station, and prizes for anyone who attends.

The cost is 25 dollars for registration that occurs after March 31. All runners who register before April 9, online at www.casabaltco.com, will receive a free T-shirt. If runners register after the April 9 deadline they will not be guaranteed a T-shirt.

The race is expected to have a strong attendance this year. “We [CASA club] know that several community groups and other schools have expressed interest in coming, and hope that many students choose to attend,” Turner said.

Turner had to write and communicate with all the sponsoring businesses and families, design t-shirts, secure the venue for the race, plan the race logistics (course start and finish, timing, etc), and determine how many people they could provide for.

“With all the work we put in we are looking forward to a fun race to benefit a great cause,” Turner said.