Cabral host new podcast on Bulls TV Facebook page

Teacher+Ed+Martin+and+Hugh+Lory+%28%2717%29++appear+on+Tony%27s+premier+episode+in+a+heated+sports+dispute.+%22we+had+a+good+debate+and+it+was+a+fun+experience.%22+Lory+said.+%22I%27m+always+welcome+to+do+something+with+my+boy+Mr+Martin.%22

Photo provided by Wes Porter

Teacher Ed Martin and Hugh Lory ('17) appear on Tony's premier episode in a heated sports dispute. "we had a good debate and it was a fun experience." Lory said. "I'm always welcome to do something with my boy Mr Martin."

Wes Porter, Reporter

A podcast is coming to Hereford from wHHS host Tony Cabral (’17).

Podcasts are transforming some forward-thinking schools. They provide an easy and cost-efficient way to communicate. An article in The Guardian states that “every school should be podcasting.”

At Oakington Manor foundation school in London, Ophelia Vanderpuye, the school’s head of Information and Communications Technology, claims that their school’s podcast has been beneficial.

“Podcasting has transformed our school,” Vanderpuye said. “Kids are excited by it and it’s opened new ways of communicating with others.”

Sparrows Point and Dundalk have podcasts right now, but Principal Joe Jira is excited to have one at Hereford.

“I’ve been here for 10 years now and I don’t remember anything like this being done,” Jira said. “I want to move forward with the school—we’ve got the technology, we’ve got the rebuild, we’ve got the people who have the expertise, and if we have the students willing, let’s move forward.”

In Cabral’s case, he hopes to reach a wide audience and broadcast news that people in the community would otherwise not be able to hear.

“I’m planning to make a biweekly podcast that will air Friday’s right before enrichment at around 10:30,” Cabral said. “It will be about 20 minutes long, pre-recorded, and will play for the whole school.”

Cabral has had the idea for some time, but it is just now becoming reality.

“I’ve wanted to do this for a while,” Cabral said. “It will be a very student-oriented project, made by the students for the students.”

Technology teacher Weston Fellows credits Tony with the podcast’s creation.

“Tony has been a real go-getter, and he’s stepped up on the start of the podcast and followed through,” Fellows said. “He’s really interested and dedicated in making this show work.”

Cabral’s podcast will have a variety of segments.

“We’re going to talk about stuff going on around the school, opinions, debates, and things students say but teachers don’t hear,” Cabral said. “Essentially anything students would be interested in.”

Cabral is very open about what will be on the podcast, and welcomes anyone who has something to say. His first segment will feature various teachers and students from around the school, and Fellows thinks everyone should tune in.

“It’s going to be really entertaining. [Tony] has put a lot of work into it, and he’s got some great guests,” Fellows said. “I think it’s going to really relevant to students, and I think they’re going to be pretty amused by some of the stuff he has coming.”

Cabral plans to pass the podcast-torch to an underclassmen when he graduates, but for now the first installment will premier April 7 at 10:30.

“You access it from a link on the wHHS TV Facebook page,” Cabral said. “It’s probably going to be one of the best things to happen to Hereford High School.”

 

Caption: Teacher Ed Martin and Hugh Lory (’17) appear on Tony’s premier episode in a heated sports dispute. “We had a good debate and it was a fun experience,” Lory said. “I’m always welcome to do something with my boy Mr. Martin.”