Seniors prepare for interviews

Photo by Alexis Gavrelis A speaker from Men’s Warehouse addresses students about how to dress for success. Mike Riley (12), who attended the assembly, said that the presentation prepared him for the future and that he got a free shirt. David Hatton (12), said that they participated in “a couple cool things, like tie [tying] races.”
Photo by Alexis Gavrelis
A speaker from Men’s Warehouse addresses students about how to dress for success. Mike Riley (12), who attended the assembly, said that the presentation prepared him for the future and that he got a free shirt. David Hatton (12), said that they participated in “a couple cool things, like tie [tying] races.”

Alexis Gavrelis

Picture this: It’s Decemberer 13th. Nervously, seniors throughout the school rub their sweaty palms onto the newly pressed skirt or pants that their mothers ironed for them only a few hours earlier. They wait impatiently for their allotted interview, going over a list in their mind for the billionth time. Cover letter: written, outfit: ironed (and a tad sweaty), resume: typed.

The underclassmen stare as their-peers-turned business people clap awkwardly down the halls in their heels, and the boys-turned -businessmen adjust their ties so they can catch a few more gulps of air. To the untrained eye there is no way to differentiate between teacher and student—welcome to Senior Interview Day!

The day that quickens every senior’s heartbeat comes around twice a year and as a requirement for all English classes, seniors must go through their own interviews for jobs of their choosing. That’s right. Students get to choose what job they will interview for. “We’re the only school out of 26 that does this,” said School to Career Transition Coordinator, Ms. Cheryl Burkett. So, once students pick their poison—whether it be accounting or nursing— it’s important to take it seriously because local employers are taking their time to create the most authentic interview experience possible.

Reader, if you’re a fellow senior; don’t fret. There are a few steps that can be taken to ensure success and secure the “job” of your dreams.

First, there are few things truer than this statement: First impressions are everything; there is no such thing as a second chance to make an awesome first impression. It’s been said that an employer will decide whether or not they want to hire an interviewee within the first sixty seconds. Second, spell check is your friend. It’s critical to read over all cover letters and resumes, and once it’s been read over it’s even more critical to read it again and then let friends read it. Spelling errors warp the employer’s perception of an otherwise perfect job candidate. “The paper version of you reflects intelligence,” said Ms. Burkett. Third, during the interview avoid words like “um” and “uh.” Try to keep movements and responses polished, and maintain eye contact. Think of it as your 15 minutes of fame.